What Happens if my Elevator Fails an Inspection?

If you’ve been keeping up with your elevator’s regular maintenance, there are still many small issues that can cause your elevator to fail an inspection. In fact, failures are not entirely uncommon. For example, it was found that between 2004-2008, almost none of the elevators in public housing buildings in New York City passed routine inspections. If an elevator in your building has failed an inspection, action needs to be taken quickly. Continue Reading…

OSHA Electronic Reporting in 2017

In 2016, the Occupational Health and Safety Administration passed a new rule that requires employers to submit injury and illness information electronically starting Jan 1, 2017. This information will help OSHA track compliance, and it will also be made publicly available in what OSHA calls a “nudge” to employers to be more focused on safety. Continue Reading…

The 21st Century Skyscraper

In the 20th century, the term “skyscraper” evolved to generally mean a building taller than 164 ft. Steel and concrete were readily-available materials in cities like Chicago and New York that made these constructions possible. But with a record number of 106 skyscrapers, over 656ft tall built in 2015,  these classic structures are surging in popularity as they undergo their own revolution to match evolving technology, ideological shifts, and modern needs. Continue Reading…

What Do We Mean When We Say an Elevator is “Safe”?

Elevator safety is an important thing—but what exactly makes an elevator “safe”? Outside the legal standards established by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), there’s value to be found in examining what a safe elevator looks like from the perspectives of owners, users, and maintenance technicians. Continue Reading…

2017 Resolutions For Your Building

Throughout the year, building owners can find it difficult to prioritize improvements and stay diligent with maintenance. If you’re wondering what New Year’s resolutions will pay off for your building in 2017, here are a few you might not have considered. Continue Reading…

Manhattan Buildings Receive Historic Designation Before Zoning Change

11 buildings in Manhattan’s east midtown were designated as New York City landmarks by the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission. The move was not popular with the Real Estate Board of New York, which opposed all 11 designations. A zoning proposal working its way through city government would allow developers to replace older buildings with newer in a 78-block region including Grand Central and areas north. Today, those blocks house 70 million square feet of offices. The landmark designation doesn’t mean the usage and interiors of these buildings can’t change; it just means that any changes must be made with respect to their historic nature, and they can’t be torn down. Continue Reading…

Children and Elevator Safety

Elevators are built with safety in mind, but those riding them also need to be aware of how they should interact with them and others while waiting and riding. This is especially true for children who don’t have much experience in riding elevators. Here’s a few safe elevator riding practices that every child should know. Continue Reading…

The Skilled Labor Renaissance

In 2013, a Boston Consulting Group (BCG) survey estimated that the United States was short around 90,000 manufacturing workers. At the time, that only represented around 1% of the total manufacturing workforce. By 2020, the Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts this shortage could increase to as many as 875,000 workers when machinists, welders, industrial machine operators, and engineers retire. This gap will be heightened if recruitment and education isn’t prioritized in the manufacturing sector—because US manufacturing is poised to make a comeback. Continue Reading…